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Division of Banking and Securities

Director Schmidt

Robert H. Schmidt
Division Director

Program Overview

The division regulates state depository and non-depository financial institutions, administers and enforces Alaska's financial services laws, and provides information for consumers, investors, entrepreneurs, and regulated industries. The division has three primary functional areas; licensing, examinations, and enforcement. Division staff answer inquiries, investigate and resolve complaints, and contribute to education and outreach activities.


DCCED Proposes Changes to Regulations Dealing With the Sale and Offerings of Securities in Alaska

The Department of Commerce, Community, and Economic Development proposes to adopt regulation changes in Title 3, Chapter 8, of the Alaska Administrative Code, dealing with the registration and sale of securities in Alaska, registration and licensing of broker dealers, agents, and investment advisers. Title 3, Chapter 8 has been entirely re-written and re-numbered. Many additions and deletions have been made to the regulation. Interested persons are encouraged to read the entire document before commenting.

Comments may be made through the Alaska Online Public Notice system or via email to dbsregs@alaska.gov.


Geopolitical Conflict, Cybersecurity Threat and Mitigation

The Alaska Division of Banking and Securities urges financial institutions and industries to monitor current events in Ukraine and Europe. Events could pose significant cybersecurity risks for the U.S. financial sector. For more details please link to the News and Alerts page.


COVID-19 Special Notices

Please check our News and Alerts page for updates or additional guidance that may be issued related to the pandemic.

Regulation Updates

Disclaimer:

This site is provided as a public service for general informational purposes only; it does not attempt to address specific business transactions or legal disputes. This service is not intended to be legal advice, and should not be construed as a replacement for competent legal counsel.