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Alaska Native Language Preservation
and Advisory Council

The Alaska Native Language Preservation & Advisory Council provides recommendations and advice to both the Governor and Legislature on programs, policies, and projects; and to network and advocate in support of the Council’s mission.

The Alaska Native Language Preservation & Advisory Council was created by the second session of the 27th Legislature. The Governor appointed to the council five voting members who are professional language experts and who represent diverse regions of the state.

In addition, one member of the Senate appointed by the President of the Senate and one member of the House of Representatives appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall serve on the council as nonvoting members. In appointing the nonvoting members of the Council, the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall appoint a member of the bush caucus, if a bush caucus exists. In this subsection, "bush caucus" means a group of legislators that represents rural areas of the state. The members appointed by the Governor shall serve at the pleasure of the governor.

What's New At ANLPAC!

    Alaska Native Language Council Urges New Directions in Alaska Native Language Survival

    The Alaska Native Language Preservation and Advisory Council has just published its 2018 Biennial Report to the Governor and Legislature. It is the culmination of the Council’s meetings with stakeholder groups over the past 24 months since the 2016 Biennial Report came out and is required by Alaska Statute 44.33.520. Created by the Legislature in 2012, the Council oversees research from which it makes findings and recommendations to the State of Alaska on how Alaska can best promote the continued survival of Alaska’s Indigenous languages.

    Key themes in this 2018 Report are: self-determination of Alaska Native peoples shaping the future survival of their own languages; cultural justice in reclaiming their traditional and cultural forms of practice; and highlighting the best practices to increase the number of speakers of Alaska Native languages. 

    Although all Alaska Native languages are recognized as official languages of the State of Alaska, every one has seen a decline in the number of speakers over the last several decades. While the declines continue, there some noteworthy successes where English-only Alaskans have become fluent in one of Alaska’s Native languages, either as students in a language immersion school or by working individually in a master-apprentice relationship with a fluent elder. These new, fluent, second-language speakers spark new hope for all of Alaska’s threatened and endangered Native languages—especially as some are now raising their own children as new, first-language speakers.

  • Press Release - Council Urges Self-Determination in Alaska Native Language Survival
  • 2018 Biennial Report to the Governor and the Legislature
  • 2016 Biennial Report to the Governor and the Legislature
  • 2016 Summary of ANLPAC Recommendations
Openings Within the Council

For more information about the Alaska Native Language
Preservation & Advisory Council contact:

D. Roy Mitchell, IV
Research Analyst
Phone: 907-269-3646


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