Skip to content
Back to Top

Telehealth Information

The remote delivery of health care is an important, but complex, part of Alaska’s health care system. Several state agencies are working together to assist the public and providers in navigating this changing landscape. Please review the links below for more information regarding your specific question or interest.

What are the standards for telehealth delivery?

  • A provider may deliver health care services via telehealth without an initial in-person exam if the provider holds an Alaska license.
  • The provider must only provide services within their authorized scope of practice.
  • Fees for telehealth services must be reasonable and consistent with ordinary fees for the same in-person service.
  • There is no requirement to document the barrier to in-person health care delivery.
  • There is no limitation to the physical setting from which telehealth may be delivered.
  • Neither the patient nor the provider is required to use telehealth to deliver health care services.

To whom do these telehealth standards apply?

Alaska-licensed audiologist or speech-language pathologist; behavior analyst; chiropractor; professional counselor; dentist or dental hygienist; dietitian or nutritionist; naturopath; marital and family therapist; physician, podiatrist, osteopath, or physician assistant; direct-entry midwife; nurse or advanced practice registered nurse (APRN); dispensing optician; optometrist; pharmacist; physical therapist or occupational therapist; psychologist or psychological associate; social worker; or a physician licensed in another state.

Who may prescribe a controlled substance via telehealth? Under what conditions?

  • Alaska-licensed physicians (including osteopaths and podiatrists) and physician assistants may prescribe a controlled substance via telehealth if the provider complies with AS 08.64.364 and federal law.
  • Alaska-licensed APRNs may prescribe a controlled substance via telehealth if the provider complies with AS 08.68.710 and federal law.
  • Prescription, dispensation, and administration of a controlled substance may not be conducted via telehealth except by physicians (including osteopaths and podiatrists), physician assistants, or APRNs.

When may a physician not licensed in Alaska provide services to a patient located in Alaska? What happens if a patient has a complaint about that care?

  • Physicians who are licensed in another state may practice telehealth without an Alaska license if:
    • The physician and patient have an established physician-patient relationship and the physician has previously conducted an in-person examination of the patient; or
    • If the patient has a suspected or diagnosed life-threatening condition for which the patient has been referred by an Alaska-licensed physician to a physician licensed in another state and the visit relates to that condition.
  • The State Medical Board has augmented authority to:
    • Sanction the practice of a physician who is practicing telehealth without a license who is found be in violation of law, and
    • Allow the board to recover from a physician the cost of proceedings resulting in a sanction of unlicensed practice under this new provision, including the costs of investigation by the board and department and hearing costs.

My patient is vacationing in Alaska. Do I need an Alaska license to treat them remotely while they are on vacation?

Yes. Alaska laws are based on where the patient receives service. Individual licensing boards may offer special courtesy licenses or opportunities for an out-of-state provider to consult with an Alaska provider if the patient requires special health care services while physically located in our state. For more information on the requirements of these licensed professions, please visit that specific program’s link at the DCCED/CBPL Professional Licensing website to review statutes, regulations, announcements, and more.

Do I need an Alaska license to prescribe to a patient located in the state? Can an out-of-state pharmacy transfer a prescription to an Alaska pharmacy?

Alaska pharmacies may only fill prescriptions issued directly from prescribers who do not hold an Alaska license if that prescription is not a controlled substance.

Unless the out-of-state pharmacy is licensed in the state of Alaska or has entered into a Shared Pharmacy Services Agreement, an Alaska pharmacy may only fill a prescription from a pharmacy licensed in another state that is not an Alaska Schedule I or II controlled substance.

What is the Telemedicine Business Registry, and who has to register?

All businesses engaged in or planning to engage in distance delivery of health care to a patient located in Alaska must register with the state’s Telemedicine Business Registry. A provider who is an employee of a business does not need to individually register; however, the employer does. "Telemedicine services" means the delivery of health care services using the transfer of medical data through audio, visual, or data communications that are performed over two or more locations by a provider who is physically separated from the recipient of the health care services. AS 44.33.381

Do I also need an Alaska business license?

If your business would like to provide telemedicine services to Alaska-based clients, a valid Alaska business license is required before submitting the Telemedicine Business Registry application. To register, please provide your Alaska Business License number on the Telemedicine Business Registry license application. Applications for a business license may be obtained through the Business Licensing Section of this division.

Still have questions?

How do I learn more about a specific profession?
For more information on the requirements of these licensed professions, please visit that specific program’s link at the DCCED/CBPL Professional Licensing website to review statutes, regulations, announcements, and more. If you are a licensed provider and have questions after using the links on this page, please contact the appropriate state licensing board with your specific questions through the Customer Contact Form on the DCCED/CBPL website.

How do I learn more about the new telehealth laws that enacted some of these changes?
HB 265 was signed into law and became effective on July 14, 2022. This legislation adds a section to centralized licensing statutes (AS 08.01.085) expanding and clarifying telehealth capacity for health care providers. It also clarifies parameters of telehealth prescription of a controlled substance by physicians, physician assistants, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). Please click the link for the new legislation since it may not yet be reflected in other online sources.

What about insurance coverage and telehealth billing?

  • Medicaid questions:Click here.
  • Medicare questions: Click here.
  • Questions regarding state employee and retiree coverage can be directed to the Division of Retirement and Benefits.
  • Otherwise, please contact the individual insurance carrier for their specific rules and procedures regarding telehealth delivery.

What if I still have questions?
If you are a licensed provider and have questions after using the links on this page, please contact the appropriate state licensing board with your specific questions through the Customer Contact Form on the DCCED/CBPL website.