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State Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy Board

Frequently Asked Questions


How does a person become licensed as a physical therapist or occupational therapist in Alaska?

Therapists have presented evidence satisfactory to the Board of having successfully completed the academic requirements of an accredited program approved by the Board. Therapists have taken and passed an examination which tests the knowledge of the basic and clinical sciences relating to physical therapy and occupational therapy. Therapists must also meet licensing requirements set in statute and regulation.

How do I find application forms?

Our website has the forms you will need under Applications and Forms. Miscellaneous forms may be located under CBPL QUICK Links in the sidebar.

How long does it take to process my application?

You should plan 8 weeks for licensure. We process applications in date order of receipt. You can avoid delays with your application by making sure you follow the directions and fully complete the application as instructed. You must submit the correct fees and supporting documentation in the proper format. Primary Source documents must come directly from the providers; Transcripts, Professional References, License Verifications, Verification of Working Experience etc...

Can I submit scanned, faxed, or emailed copies to complete my application?

While the initial application must be mailed due to the notarized signature and inclusion of confidential social security number information, source documents can be scanned, emailed, and/or faxed. Primary sources and applicants can send documents via mail, fax, or email. For quickest delivery method, send to physicalandoccupationaltherapy@alaska.gov.

What are the requirements to qualify for a license?

Condensed Application Instructions with the requirements for Licensure are in the first 3 pages of the application packet. For additional information, including education and experience requirements, you may review the Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Statutes and Regulations Webpage.

How do I request a verification of my license to another agency?

Effective November 22, 2022, Alaska is providing primary source license verifications directly through our website. Requests and fees for verifications of licensure are no longer necessary. To obtain primary source verifications, utilize our Professional License Search Tool.

How do I change my address?

Use the Edit Contact Information feature in your MyLicense record in MyAlaska to update youre new mailing address. This will instantly update your address of record. If you prefer (please allow 3 weeks processing time), we will accept an e-mail or Address Change Form that comes directly from the licensee or applicant. We cannot accept a telephone call for a change of address.

Board of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy
P.O. Box 110806
Juneau, AK 99811-0806
Email: physicalandoccupationaltherapy@alaska.gov

How do I change my name?

To change your name, mail an original send a Certified True Copy of the legal document that reflects the name change via mail, fax or email to physicalandoccupationaltherapy@alaska.gov OR download the Change of Name Form from our web site (a copy of the legal document must accompany the change).

Board of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy
P.O. Box 110806
Juneau, AK 99811-0806

How do I get a “Certified True Copy”?

To obtain a Certified True Copy, take the original document and a photocopy to a notary public to compare the original to the photocopy of the document. Either the applicant or the notary must write, “I certify this to be a true copy of the original document” on the photocopy and attest to that fact by signing the document and having it notarized.

Is my license record public information?

Yes, licensing records are public documents and available to members of the public upon written request and payment of copying fees. Information considered confidential and not releasable to the general public include social security numbers and other information considered confidential by state or federal law. Your address of record is public information and can be located on the division’s online License Search. Licensees have expressed concern that their address is so readily available. Some licensees have elected to have a post office box or practice location for their official address of record to avoid having their residential address easily accessible. Please be advised that all notices from the Board (renewal notices, licenses, and other legal documents) will be mailed to the address of record provided.

When does my license lapse?

All licenses issued by the Board Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy expire on June 30 of even-numbered years regardless of when issued, except new licenses issued within 90 days of the expiration date will be issued to the next biennium.

Do I have to pay the full renewal fee since I was just issued a permanent license within the past year?

No. Licensees who received a permanent license within one year of the current expiration date do submit a renewal application but will pay only one-half of the renewal fee.

When will I receive my renewal notice?

Renewal notices are mailed at least 30 days before the expiration date to the address we have on file for you. If you have a change of address, don’t wait until the last minute to give us that information, otherwise, your renewal notice may be delayed in getting to you. Failure to receive a renewal notice does not relieve a licensee from the responsibility of renewing a license on time.

How do I reinstate my license?

Reinstatement requirements are set out in the “Application for Reinstatement” form available from this web site. Note: continuing education used to “reinstate” your license may not be used to “renew” your license.

How does the Board monitor competency of licensees?

The Board requires each licensee participate in continued competence and continuing education for the purpose of updating and developing skills to provide appropriate physical therapy and occupational therapy services. Ten percent of licensees are randomly selected for audit of continued competency and continuing education at license renewal.

How are complaints filed?

A complaint may be filed by anyone; a patient, family member, another health care worker/professional. Contact the Investigative Unit of the Division. Investigative Unit: (907) 269-8437

When does the Board take disciplinary action?

When the Investigations Unit has proven that a therapist has:

  • Practiced physical therapy/occupational therapy in a manner detrimental to the public health and welfare;
  • Been negligent in practicing or assisting in the practice of physical therapy/occupational therapy;
  • Obtained or attempted to obtain a license by fraud or deception;
  • Failed to comply with the license renewal requirements of continued competency and continuing education;
  • Engaged in unprofessional conduct relating to federal or state laws or rules.

How does the Board approve continuing education?

The Board does not preapprove continuing educational courses or activities. Course requirements are set forth in statutes and regulations. See the Continuing Education Information Board link for more information. The licensee is responsible for completing continuing education and activities which enhance professional competency and skills related to the scope of practice.

Do patients have “Direct Access” to Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Services in Alaska?

The Board's statutes do not address direct access (which means that a referral by a doctor is not necessary for care by a physical therapist or occupational therapist). It is the Board's opinion that Alaska is a direct access state; however, licensees and consumers should be aware that insurance companies may have their own directives regarding this topic.

Do you have another question?

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